PYP Subject Overview

PYP Subject Overview

The importance of the traditional subject areas is acknowledged: language; mathematics; social studies; science; personal, social and physical education; and the arts are specified as components of the PYP curriculum model. IBO has provided the school with scope and sequence documents with overall expectations for each subject.

The overall expectations are represented in phases, reflecting the stages a learner goes through when developing conceptual understanding rather than grade-level expectations.

ARIS used these documents to create the school’s scope and sequence documents. IBO believes in the transdisciplinary nature of learning; therefore, as much as possible, the single subjects are embedded into the units of inquiry. Science and social studies are fully incorporated into the Programme of Inquiry. The relationship between the other subject areas and the units of inquiry will change from one unit to another.

Language Arts

English Language
Language is fundamental to learning, thinking and communicating. Structured, purposeful inquiry is the main approach to teaching and learning language in the PYP, although other teaching strategies and styles may also be used. Language is developed across the whole curriculum, and as a result, all teachers at ARIS are language teachers who model and teach the use of language. Learning occurs in authentic contexts, and literature plays a special role in enabling this.

Students learn a language when they are using it through speaking, listening, reading and writing in order to understand and express ideas. Teachers provide opportunities for this to happen in a safe and stimulating environment in order to encourage risk-taking and learning. Our aim is to develop students’ ability to express themselves fluently, confidently and accurately in oral, written and visual communication systems.

Language Strands

  • Oral communication: listening and speaking
  • Written communication: reading and writing
  • Visual communication: viewing and presenting

English is the primary language of instruction in the school

English Language Scope and Sequence

French/Arabic/Hindi/Spanish/ Mandarin
French/Arabic/Hindi/Spanish/Mandarin is offered as Lang B and Lang C from Nursery to Year 6. Students are grouped according to their language of choice and abilities. From Year 2 to 6, there will be three or four levelled groups, depending on the number of students in the grade level and their language knowledge. In Early Years classes, students are generally taught as one group. Languages PYP Scope and Sequence

English as an Additional Language (EAL)
At ARIS, we welcome students from around the world. Our students come to us with diverse cultural identities and language profiles. The English as an Additional Language (EAL) department seeks to assist students in integrating into an English-speaking environment so that they feel comfortable at our school. An equally important concern is to enable students to access all curriculum areas. Therefore, EAL students attend most classes with their peers.

To enable students to develop confidence, skills and knowledge, EAL teachers instruct students in fundamental English skills in differentiated language lessons. EAL teachers work alongside class teachers to plan, teach and assess students’ understanding of our curriculum.


Mathematics
Students develop their understanding of mathematical concepts in realistic contexts so that they can recognize the power of mathematics for describing and analysing the world around them. They inquire into relationships, interact with manipulatives and engage in conversations with others. They develop fluency with basic number facts and important skills and use these to solve problems, representing their thinking and solutions using the language of mathematics and symbolic notation.

Our aim is to develop students who are fluent in the language of mathematics and can apply their knowledge and understanding to real-world situations. The curriculum is organized under the following strands and we aim to provide a balanced experience across the strands.

Mathematical Strands

  • Data handling
  • Measurement
  • Shape and space
  • Pattern and function
  • Number

Math PYP Scope and Sequence

Science
In the PYP, science is viewed as the exploration of the behaviours of, and the interrelationships among, the natural, physical and material worlds. Science in the curriculum encourages curiosity, develops an understanding of the world and enables students to develop a sense of responsibility regarding the impact of their actions on themselves, others and the world. Students actively construct and challenge their understanding of the world around them by combining scientific knowledge with reasoning and thinking skills.

The scientific process, by encouraging hands-on experience and inquiry, enables the student to make informed and responsible decisions. ARIS aims to develop scientific concepts and knowledge through hypothesizing, making accurate observations and thinking critically about findings.


Science Strands

  • Living things
  • Earth and space
  • Materials and matter
  • Forces and energy

Science PYP Scope and Sequence

Social studies
In the PYP, social studies is viewed as the study of people in relation to their past, their present and their future, their environment and their society. The social studies curriculum encourages curiosity and develops an understanding of a rapidly changing world. Students develop an understanding of their personal and cultural identities through social studies, as well as the skills and knowledge needed to participate actively in their classroom, their school, their community and the world: to understand themselves in relation to their community.

ARIS aims to develop students’ understanding of the world around them, historical and geographical influences and the role of individuals in communities.

Social Studies Strands

  • Human systems and economic activities
  • Social Organization and culture
  • Continuity and change through time
  • Human and natural environments
  • Resources and the Environment

Social Studies Scope and Sequence

Personal, Social and Physical Education (PSPE)
PSPE in the PYP is concerned with the individual’s wellbeing through the promotion and development of concepts, knowledge, attitudes and skills that contribute to this wellbeing. Well-being is intrinsically linked to all aspects of a student’s experience at school and beyond.

It encompasses physical, emotional, cognitive, spiritual and social health and development and contributes to an understanding of self, to developing and maintaining relationships with others, and to participating in an active, healthy lifestyle. PSPE is the combination of two curriculum areas, PE and PSE, which are described below.

PSPE PYP Scope and Sequence

Physical Education (PE)

Through Physical Education in the PYP, students learn the “language” of physical movement and explore the skills associated with the different areas of PE. Students learn to understand what they can and cannot do physically. They become aware of their own strengths and areas to develop in this discipline.

Physical activity is an essential aspect of a balanced, healthy lifestyle and learning through PE helps build self-esteem, confidence, cooperation and fitness. We aim to stimulate students’ awareness of their physical fitness and to simultaneously develop an interest and appreciation of sport and physical activity. Swimming is included in the program for students in GYear 1 to 5

PE Strands

  • Active living
  • Movement skills
  • Interaction

Arts
Arts are integral to the PYP. They are a powerful mode of communication through which students explore and construct a sense of self and develop an understanding of the world around them. Arts provide students with a wide range of opportunities and means to respond to their experiences and engage with historical, social and cultural perspectives. The students are stimulated to think and to articulate their thoughts in new ways and through a variety of media and technologies.

The PYP recognizes that not all learning can be supported solely through language and that arts as a medium of inquiry also provide opportunities for learning, communication and expression. Learning about and through arts is fundamental to the development of the whole child, promoting creativity, critical thinking, problem-solving skills and social interactions. At ARIS arts are identified as dance, drama, music and visual arts.

Arts Strands

  • Responding
  • Creating

Arts PYP Scope and Sequence

 

Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
The PYP recognises the ever-increasing impact of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) on teaching and learning. The use of technologies is integrated as much as possible into student inquiries.

ICT provides opportunities to enhance learning and may significantly support students in their inquiries and in developing their conceptual understanding. At ARIS, technology is considered a tool for learning, albeit with its own set of skills, as opposed to an additional subject area.

Use of ICT The following six ICT skills are relevant to all learners. Each skill is transdisciplinary and will support learning both within the transdisciplinary program of inquiry and within the subject areas:

  • Investigating
  • Creating
  • Communicating
  • Collaborating
  • Organizing
  • Becoming responsible digital citizens

Library
The library is viewed as the hub of a PYP school in which students develop essential information and literacy skills by accessing various media and texts. Students will visit the library on a scheduled basis with their class once a week. All students will borrow books to take home during this time. Parents and students are welcome to visit the library at other times when the librarian is present. It is essential that students return their borrowed books. A replacement fee will be charged for any lost or damaged books or bags.


Further info: https://www.ibo.org/programmes/primary-years-programme/

Al-Rayan International School Program of Inquiry 2023-24


Our Programme of Inquiry is a living document, and the units currently listed may change as we plan, teach, and assess them collaboratively. 

 

Nursery: Nursery will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central Ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

 An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: As people grow, they develop new skills to become responsible

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Our Characteristics
  • Growth and development 
  • Our responsibility towards ourselves

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations from local and global perspectives.

 

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: Fairplay and teamwork can be experienced through play 

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Types of play 
  • Communicating through play 
  • Impact of Play on us in relation to covid 19 

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances in society and in the environment.

 

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

CI: People interact differently in the community to help one another

Lines of Inquiry:  

  • Community we belong to 
  • Roles and responsibilities of people in their communities
  • Interdependence in a community

Sharing the Planet

An Inquiry into Rights and Responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

CI: Different kinds of animals are an important part of our environment

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Animals around us
  • Importance of animals 
  • Our responsibility towards animals

 

Reception: Reception will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central Ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

 An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: Relationships we have with ourselves and each other affect how we feel and behave

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Our relationships with ourselves and others
  • Effect of relationships
  • Developing and maintaining relationships

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations from local and global perspectives.

CI: Personal history helps us to reflect on who we are and where we come from.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Personal history
  • Personal history and who we are
  • Personal history and places we belong to

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: Stories can engage their audience, communicate meaning and express feelings

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Types of stories
  • Impact of stories on us
  • Creating and sharing stories

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

CI: Materials behave and interact in certain ways, determining how people use them.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Exploring Materials
  • Changing Properties of Materials
  • The 5 R's (Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, Repurpose, Recycle

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

 

Sharing the Planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution

 

 

 

Year 1: Year 1 will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

 An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: Understanding rights and responsibilities help in the development of a better world

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Qualities of a good citizen
  • Rights and responsibility
  • Contribution of citizens to develop a better world

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations, from local and global perspectives.

CI: Homes reflect cultural influences, local conditions and people's needs

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Homes around the world-past present future
  • Influence of local conditions on homes
  • Our culture, needs and home

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: Our character reflects through the expression of feelings

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Types of feelings
  • Ways of expressing our feelings
  • Dealing and managing feelings

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

CI: All living things go through a process of change

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Characteristics of living things
  • Change sliving things go through
  • Factors that influence lifecycles

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

CI: Transportation systems may vary in different communities to suit lifestyles and meet people’s needs

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Forms and Functions of Transportation Systems
  • Decisions involved in using transportation systems
  • Systems of transportation and our changing needs

Sharing the Planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

CI: People make choices to support the sustainability of water 

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Sources and forms of water 
  • The water cycle 
  • Uses and conservation of water

 

Year 2: Year 2 will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: The choices people make affect their health and well-being.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Factors affecting health and well-being
  • Consequences of routines and choices
  • Our responsibility towards health and well-being.

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations, from local and global perspectives.

CI: Significant events provide insight into the history and values of a community

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Personal/ local/ global events.
  • Learning from significant events
  • Impact of significant events on individuals and communities.

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: Imagery and art communicate ideas and information

Lines of Inquiry:

  • Visual images and symbols 
  • The use of static and moving images in communication
  • Elements of design in creating imagery and art

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

CI: People use force and energy to create simple machines

Lines of Inquiry:

  • Understanding force and energy
  • Different forms and energy around us
  • Important inventions around us and their impact

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

CI: Different occupations help the well-being of the community by providing services. 

Lines of Inquiry: 

    • Different occupations 
  • Interdependence of occupations within a 
  • community 
  • Our responsibility towards our community

Sharing the Planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution

CI: The way people use Earth’s natural resources may cause environmental problems.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Earth’s renewable and nonrenewable resources
  • The impact of people's choices on the environment
  • The balance between meeting human needs and available resources 

 

 

Year 3: Year 3 will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: Human systems enable a response to stimuli to discover the world

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Human Systems. (Five Senses).
  • Human response to stimuli
  • Human response to stimuli

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations from local and global perspectives.

CI: The Earth’s physical geography has an impact on human interactions and settlements

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Physical features of Ghana
  • The relationship between location and settlement
  • Impact of human interaction on the physical environment

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: People use arts as a form of expression to communicate their uniqueness and culture

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Forms of art
  • Connection between arts and culture
  • Expressing uniqueness through arts and culture

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

CI: The solar system consists of space bodies that interact with each other to sustain life

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Our solar system
  • Characteristics of the planets and other space bodies
  • Interconnection between the Earth and the solar system

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

CI: People create organisations to solve problems and support human endeavours and enterprises

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Types of Organisations and their purpose
  • Roles and responsibilities in organisations
  • Factors contributing to organisational success

Sharing the Planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution

CI: Human activities can lead to the 

extinction of  living things 

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Cause and effects of  extinction 
  • Endangered species
  • Ways of preventing animal extinction

 

Year 4: Year 4 will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

 An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: Health behaviours shape who we are

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Types of microorganisms
  • Diseases caused by microorganisms
  • Implications of healthy behaviours

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations from local and global perspectives.

CI: Human migration is a response to risks, challenges and opportunities

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Reasons for migration
  • Migration throughout history
  • Effect of migration on individuals, communities and culture

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: Theatre enables the expression of emotions and feelings

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Elements of theatre arts
  • Communication through theatre
  • Impacts of theatre on societies

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

CI: Our global environment influences the way we live our lives giving rise to various environmental changes

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Forms of environmental changes
  • Forms of environmental changes
  • Our responsibility towards reducing, reusing, and recycling

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

CI: Government systems help to provide 

opportunities to its citizens for a better life

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Types of governments 
  • Role and responsibilities of governments and its citizens 
  •  Government decisions and their impact during COVID-19

Sharing the Planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

CI: In an ecosystem, living things depend on each other and their environment to survive.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • components of an eco- system 
  • Interaction between living and non- living things in an environment 
  •  Impacts of human activities on ecosystem 

 

Year 5 will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: Religious beliefs and values around the world provide new perspectives about self and others

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • World religions
  • Beliefs around the world
  • Religious harmony

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations from local and global perspectives.

CI: Exploration leads to discoveries and opportunities that influence the world in many ways. 

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Famous explorers 
    • Reasons for exploration 
  • Impact of exploration in today’s world 

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: Thoughts, emotions and feelings can be expressed and interpreted creatively through poetry

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Forms of poetry
  • Interpreting poems
  • Expressing through poetry

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and the environment.

CI: The conversion, transformation and conservation of energy may support life

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Different forms of energy sources
  • Sustainable energy practices
  • Conservation and usage of energy

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

CI: Technology changes the way people organize themselves, access information and communicate with each other

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Technology in different fields
  • Usage of digital media
  • Technology over time

Sharing the Planet

An Inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

CI: Plants undergo a process of growth to provide health benefits.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Structure of plants 
  • Life cycle of plants 
  •  The impact of agricultural technology on the earth in providing economic, health and environmental benefits

 

Year 6: Year 6 will explore the following Units of Inquiry

Trans-Disciplinary Themes

Central ideas and Lines of Inquiry

Who We Are

 An inquiry into the nature of the self; beliefs and values; personal, physical, mental, social and spiritual health; human relationships including families, friends, communities, and cultures; rights and responsibilities; what it means to be human

CI: Body systems work interdependently to keep the body in a state of homeostasis.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Body systems and how they work
  • Interdependence between body systems 
  • Human Innovation in modern science 

Where We Are In Place and Time 

An inquiry into orientation in place and time; personal histories; homes and journeys; the discoveries, explorations and migrations of humankind; the relationships between and the interconnectedness of individuals and civilisations, from local and global perspectives.

Exhibition Unit

How We Express Ourselves 

An inquiry into the ways in which we discover and express ideas, feelings, nature, culture, beliefs and values; the ways in which we reflect on, extend and enjoy our creativity; our appreciation of the aesthetic.

CI: Media is a network that portrays the face of society in which people live

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Production of films
  • Media Etiquette and Censorship
  • Impact of Film on society

How The World Works 

An inquiry into the natural world and its laws; the interaction between the natural world (physical and biological) and human societies; how humans use their understanding of scientific principles; the impact of scientific and technological advances on society and on the environment.

CI: Materials may undergo physical and chemical changes to meet people’s needs

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • Properties of materials 
  • Reversible and irreversible changes
  • The Impact of materials’ innovation on Society

How We Organize Ourselves 

An inquiry into the interconnectedness of human-made systems and communities; the structure and function of organizations; societal decision-making; economic activities and their impact on humankind and the environment.

CI: Developing money management skills may lead to enhanced financial stability.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • History of money
  • Forms of money
  • Ways of growing a business

Sharing the Planet

An inquiry into rights and responsibilities in the struggle to share finite resources with other people and with other living things; communities and the relationships within and between them; access to equal opportunities; peace and conflict resolution.

CI: Conflict resolution strategies influence relationships.

Lines of Inquiry: 

  • History and causes of conflicts 
  • Conflict resolution strategies 
  • People and organizations that worked for world peace